Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 5

Ex2013 LogoToday, Cumulative Update 5 for Exchange Server 2013 was released by the Exchange Team (KB2936880). This update raises Exchange 2013 version number to 15.0.913.22.

This Cumulative Update contains the following fixes compared to SP1 (CU4):

  • 2963590 Message routing latency if IPv6 is enabled in Exchange Server 2013
  • 2963566 Outlook Web App accessibility improvement for UI appearance in Exchange Server 2013
  • 2962439 You cannot sync contacts or tasks in Microsoft CRM client for Outlook in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • 2962435 CRM synchronization fails if the time zone name of a meeting is not set in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • 2962434 Slow performance in Outlook Web App when Lync is integrated with Exchange Server 2013
  • 2958430 “Some or all Identity references could not be translated” error when you manage DAG in Exchange Server 2013 SP1 in a disjoint namespace domain
  • 2957592 IME is disabled in Outlook Web App when you press Tab to move the focus in an email message in Exchange Server 2013
  • 2942609 Exchange ActiveSync proxy does not work from Exchange Server 2013 to Exchange Server 2007
  • 2941221 EWS integration for Lync works incorrectly in an Exchange Server 2013 and 2007 coexistence environment
  • 2926742 Plain-text message body is cleared when writing in Outlook Web App by using Internet Explorer 8 in Exchange Server 2013
  • 2926308 Sender’s email address is broken after importing a PST file into an Exchange Server 2013 mailbox
  • 2925559 Users always get the FBA page when they access OWA or ECP in Exchange Server 2013
  • 2924519 “SyncHealth\Hub” folder is created unexpectedly after installing Cumulative Update 2 for Exchange Server 2013
  • 2916113 Cannot open .tif files from email messages by using Windows-based applications in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • 2592398 Email messages in the Sent Items folder have the same PR_INTERNET_MESSAGE_ID property in an Exchange Server 2010 environment

Notes:

  • Be advised that this CU includes a Managed Availability probe configuration that may result in the frequently restarting of the Microsoft Exchange Shared Cache Service in some environments. More information, see KB2971467.
  • Be advised of OAB architectural changes documented here. If you are affected, it is recommended to update CAS servers prior to Mailbox servers.

This Cumulative Update includes schema and AD changes, so make sure you run PrepareSchema / PrepareAD. After updating, the schema version will be 15300.

Note that Cumulative Updates can be installed directly, i.e. no need to install RTM or Service Packs prior to installing Cumulative Updates. Note that once installed, you can’t uninstall a Cumulative Update nor any of the installed Exchange server roles. The order of upgrading servers is irrelevant, unlike with previous generations of Exchange.

Finally, and I can’t emphasize this enough: For any Hotfix, Rollup, Service Pack or Cumulative Update, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production. When you lack such facilities, hold out a week or two and monitor the comments on the release article or TechNet forum for any issues.

You can download Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 5 here; UM Language Packs can be found here. More details about these changes, preparing Active Directory or installing this Cumulative Update can be found in the original announcement.

Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 6

Exchange 2010 LogoToday the Exchange Team released Rollup 6 for Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 (KB2936871). This update raises Exchange 2010 version number to 14.3.195.1.

This Rollup includes the following fixes:

  • 2960652 Organizer name and meeting status field can be changed by EAS clients in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2957762 “A folder with same name already exists” error when you rename an Outlook folder in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2952799 Event ID 2084 occurs and Exchange server loses connection to the domain controllers in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2934091 Event ID 1000 and 7031 when users cannot connect to mailboxes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2932402 Cannot move a mailbox after you install Exchange Server 2010 SP3 RU3 (KB2891587)
  • 2931842 EWS cannot identify the attachment in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2928703 Retention policy is applied unexpectedly to a folder when Outlook rule moves a copy in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2927265 Get-Message cmdlet does not respect the defined write scope in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2925273 Folder views are not updated when you arrange by categories in Outlook after you apply Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 Update Rollup 3 or Update Rollup 4
  • 2924592 Exchange RPC Client Access service freezes when you open an attached file in Outlook Online mode in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2923865 Cannot connect to Exchange Server 2010 when the RPC Client Access service crashes

Notes:

  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
  • If you got a DAG and want to properly update the DAG members, check the instructions here.
  • Rollups are cumulative, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

As with any Hotfix, Rollup or Service Pack, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this rollup in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production.

You can download Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 6 here.

Get-MyMailboxStatistics

powershellLast update: Version 1.01, July 14th, 2014.

Those leveraging quota settings to manage their Exchange environments, you are probably periodically running some sort of script or set of cmdlets to retrieve information on mailbox sizes, quota settings and if any mailbox is above any of the quota thresholds. For a quick indication of the current size in relation to the quota settings, StorageLimitStatus may contain one of the following indicators depending on the quota settings on the mailbox or mailbox database hosting the mailbox:

  • BelowLimit – Speaks for itself
  • IssueWarning – Mailbox size above Issue Warning limit
  • ProhibitSend – Mailbox size above Prohibit Send limit
  • NoChecking – No quota checking
  • MailboxDisabled – Mailbox size above Prohibit Send and Receive quota limit

So, to get a list of all mailboxes with any over-quota status, you can use:

Get-MailboxDatabase | Get-MailboxStatistics | Where {$_.StorageLimitStatus -match 'IssueWarning|ProhibitSend|MailboxDisabled'} | Select DisplayName, ItemCount, TotalItemSize, StorageLimitStatus, LastLogonTime

Unfortunately, in Exchange 2013 the StorageLimitStatus gets no longer populated:

image

As KB2819389 explains, this is by design. In Exchange 2013, mailbox quotas are no longer cached. By not being cached, retrieving quota information may result in poor performance as it queries Active Directory for quota related attributes. The argument is a bit puzzling, considering there is a NoADLookup switch which directs the cmdlet to retrieve information from the mailbox database (cache) instead of Active Directory. Perhaps a better workaround would have been to make NoADLookup a parameter, make it $true by default and leave StorageLimitStatus unpopulated when NoADLookup is $true.

Of course, that does not help customers who want a quick quota report. For this purpose I have created two things in 1 script:

  1. A helper function Get-StorageLimitStatus() which will take a mailbox statistics object and return a StorageLimitStatus object.
  2. A script Get-MyMailboxStatistics.ps1, a proxy function for Get-MailboxStatistics which will use the Get-StorageLimitStatus helper function to populate the StorageLimitStatus.

Get-StorageLimitStatus
When you want to use the helper function, extract it and include it in your quota reporting script or PowerShell profile (making it available when firing up a shell). To use the helper function in the cmdlet shown earlier, use:

Get-MailboxDatabase | Get-MailboxStatistics | Where {$_.StorageLimitStatus -match 'IssueWarning|ProhibitSend|MailboxDisabled'} | Select -ExcludeProperty StorageLimitStatus DisplayName, ItemCount, TotalItemSize, @{n="StorageLimitStatus"; e={ Get-StorageLimitStatus $_}}, LastLogonTime

This will remove StorageLimitStatus from the output and add a calculated field bearing the same the name, calling the Get-StorageLimitStatus helper function with the current mailbox statistics object to set its value.

Get-MyMailboxStatistics.ps1
This is a proxy function for the Exchange Management Shell cmdlet Get-MailboxStatistics. This means that the current, original cmdlet was used to create a wrapper which will call the original cmdlet. Having a wrapper allows you to restrict or enhance the original cmdlet and tailor it to your needs.

A quick tip on how to create a proxy script in the clipboard (more information on creating proxy commands here):

$data= New-Object System.Management.Automation.CommandMetaData (Get-Command Get-MailboxStatistics) 
[System.Management.Automation.ProxyCommand]::create($data) | clip.exe

Downside is that future changes to the Get-MailboxStatistics cmdlet will not be automatically incorporated in the wrapper. Feeding it objects also doesn’t work, but you can work around that by temporary storing the objects in a variable and passing that to the script (see examples below).

To populate the StorageLimitStatus, we will post-process each object in the output of Get-MailboxStatistics, using Add-Member to overwrite (-Force) its current value and –PassThru to pass it along in the pipeline. Being a proxy command, the parameter options are identical to the original Get-MailboxStatistics. Some examples:

.\Get-MailboxStatistics.ps1 -Database MDB2
$m= Get-Mailbox –Database MDB2 
$m | .\Get-MailboxStatistics.ps1 | ft –AutoSize DisplayName,TotalItemSize,StorageLimitStatus

image

Do be aware that this will incur Active Directory queries and thus performance of the script may not seem fast. However, in previous versions of Exchange you got immediate results as all the quota information was readily available from the cache. On the plus side, the status you see will be non-cached, current information.

On a final note and maybe needless to say that in order to use this you need to run it from the Exchange Management Shell and since it’s an unsigned script you need to set ExecutionPolicy to Unrestricted.

Feedback
Feedback is welcomed through the comments. If you got scripting suggestions or questions, do not hesitate using the contact form.

Download
You can download the script from the TechNet Gallery here.

Revision History
See Technet Gallery page.

Clutter in the Gutter?

At the Microsoft Exchange Conference earlier this year, the Office team introduced us to some nice features which were under development at that time. These features are part of Office Graph, a machine learning feature set meant to make the end user experience more personal and contextual as part of the Enterprise Social initiative.

imageIn the keynote, during a “Geek out with Perry”, Perry (Corporate VP for Microsoft Exchange) mentioned that the “Cloud First” approach allowed Microsoft to implement features step by step, with the option of reverting not-so-good changes. In the end, this should also result in a better product for the on-premises customer when releasing new Exchange builds, and ultimately Exchange v.Next (the next version), as they would not receive the not-so-good changes. It was mentioned several times, also in individual sessions on Office Graph features like Clutter and Groups as well, that these features would be “cloud-first” but there was “no ETA yet” for Exchange on-premises. At that time, most of us leaving MEC did that with the impression that all these features, at some point, would make it to Exchange or Exchange v.Next.

Apparently we got hold of the wrong end of the stick. Last week this article appeared on Network World, where in an interview with Julia White (GM Office Marketing) she mentioned that Clutter would not make it to “Office Server”, which seems to be the term for the on-premises deployments of the Exchange, Sharepoint and Lync Server triplet. This was a bit surprising, given the information received at MEC. The reason given in the article for this deviation was that Office Graph is too “compute intensive” to include on a Office Server. I assume to preempt any sounds on being forced to the service, Julia states that, “It’s not capricious favoritism toward Office 365 customers.” This is more or less in line with Microsoft’s earlier statements, on not having plans to stop delivering on-premises releases of Exchange (v.Next). In the discussion that followed on Twitter, Julia confirmed that “Clutter won’t make ExServer v.Next unfortunately.”

File:Classic shot of the ENIAC.jpgThe scale of Office 365 is incomparable to the average business running Exchange, Sharepoint and Lync on-premises and the amount of information that needs to be processed for Office Graph. And I can’t help it, but looking at the ‘compute intensive’ argument brings back memories of computer rooms where big monolithic systems offered computing powered easily surpassed by today’s tablet. With Clutter being expected for later this year and vNext next year, that is a considerable window. Some claim that Moore’s Law is obsolete and we also can’t expect to be running Skynet from home next year but still, computing power increases and I know of some customers who would just get the additional hardware onboard to facilitate those extra features. In addition, Clutter can be enabled on a per-user basis anyway.

In a more or less opposite statement, Julia is quoted saying, “Our philosophy is anything we technically can ship in servers, we will. We want our server customers and our cloud customers to have as much as we can ship to them. If it’s possible technically and it’s feasible then we’ll put it in the servers.” I think the reason for not adding Clutter should be sought in the hints Julia provided in the 2nd part of the article. With on-premises customer not following or even delaying upgrading to current versions of Microsoft’s products, Exchange, Sharepoint, Lync and clients, makes it hard to ship and support product transcending features, especially if this requires the latest (and greatest) version.

Think Site Mailboxes, more or less the predecessor of the announced Groups feature of Office Graph. Implementing Site Mailboxes requires Exchange 2013, Sharepoint 2013 and Outlook 2013 and additional configuration to integrate the Exchange and Sharepoint products. In the field, I see very low adoption of Site Mailboxes. Many customers are running older product levels (blocking implementation) or it’s a more elementary reason like not having deployed Sharepoint. But then, for those that are running Site Mailboxes, it adds value. Isn’t that what this is all about? Note that for the compliance discovery feature to work, proper configuration of Exchange, Sharepoint and Lync is required as well, but compliance is perhaps is a better selling point than clutter or one of the other Office Graph features could ever be.

“Assumption is ..” are the first words of a well-known saying. For the future, don’t expect anything you see announced for Office 365 to be ported to the on-premises Exchange releases, even though that product stems from the same code. Then again, features might get dropped, for reasons provided above or just because they were not ready. That’s nothing new and we got accustomed to a little disappointment now and then. In the case of Clutter, it’s a shame because it looked like a neat feature to work more efficiently through e-mail without configuring tons of rules. In the case of Groups, it is confirmed for v.Next, but you never know for sure until it is released. Meanwhile, Microsoft should maybe try to prevent confusion by demonstrating Clutter a.o. in sessions called “What’s new in Exchange“.

If you got an opinion on these changes in course or feature drops, please share them in the comments.

The UC Architects Podcast Ep38

UC2Have no fear, episode 38 of The UC Architects podcast is here!

This episode is hosted by Pat Richard, who is joined byJohan Veldhuis, John A. Cook, Tom Arbuthnot and Michel de Rooij. Editing was done by Andrew Price.

Topics discussed in this episode are:

  • TechEd is this week in Houston
  • Microsoft Certified Professionals Get a Free NFR License the KEMP VLM-5000!
  • NextHop blog is being consolidated.DrRez on FB and Twitter are being retired as well.
  • U.S. judge rules search warrants extend to overseas email accounts
  • New version of #Posterpedia that includes the new #Azure #poster and updated #MSExchange poster
  • Alternate login ID for #Office365 reduces dependence onUPN
  • Guidedwalkthroughs for Exchange, Lync,SharePoint, and Office 365
  • Exchange Connections 2014 sessions posted on the web
  • MEC 2014 Recordings are here!
  • Lyncconf14 sessions onchannel9!
  • Microsoft Supported Method to Move from Pure Lync Online to Lync Server On-Premises/hybrid deployment
  • Lync Phone Edition Cumulative Update
  • Microsoft extends support for Lync Phone Edition
  • Pool Ownership Conflict moving users between Lync Pools
  • Microsoft LyncWireshark Plugin
  • Why you shouldn’t use .local in your Active Directory domain name
  • Lync Insights
  • Lync Phone App updated
  • iPad/iPhone and certificates

More information on the podcast including references and a link to download the podcast here or you can subscribe to the podcasts using iTunes, Zune or use the RSS feed.

About
The UC Architects is a bi-weekly community podcast by people with a passion for Unified Communications; our main focus is on Exchange, Lync or related subjects.

MEC 2014 Highlights Session

Yesterday I did a session on the highlights and (some) take-aways of the Microsoft Exchange Conference 2014.

MEC HighlightsSince there’s no confidential information in there I decided to put the presentation up for those that could not make it. You can view the presentation on here.

Why Exchange Admins should learn PowerShell

techtarget_logoAs some of you may or may not be aware of, recently I have joined the ranks of Exchange and The UC Architects fellows Michael van Horenbeeck and Steve Goodman and started writing for the Exchange section at TechTarget.

The first two articles are a call to action for Exchange admins to start working on their PowerShell skills if they have not already done so. Learning can take the more academic approach, starting from scratch and learning the basics topic by topic, or a more practical one by reading and getting to understand existing scripts which may suit the more time-constrained admin.

Read the full articles here and the follow-up article here.

If you got topic suggestions, use the contact form or send me an e-mail.

MEC Recordings on Channel9

mec2014logoA small heads-up as not everyone seems to be aware, but the recordings of the Microsoft Exchange Conference 2014 keynote and breakout sessions are up on Channel 9. A total of 74 recordings have been made available to public and they can be accessed here.

You can also download all presentation videos and – where available – slide decks for offline viewing using a script by Exchange fellow Peter Schmidt’s. The script is available here.

Exchange MVPs around the World (Updated)

Excel-2013[1]After checking the heat map of current Lync MVPs by Fabrizio Voipe, I was curious about the current geographical distribution of the Exchange MVPs. MVP awards are given to individuals by Microsoft in recognition of their contributions to the technical community.

There are little public statistics available, so I had to resort to information from the MVP site. Note that MVPs may decide not to be visible here, but looking at why people get an MVP award, I figured going in hiding isn’t one of their characteristics, thus expecting the number of non-listed MVPs to be negligible.

A little playing around with Excel and Power Map gave me the following geographical map. Not surprisingly, the major suppliers of Exchange MVPs are the United States and China.

ExchangeMVPsMAP20140426_thumb

For reference, I have included the mapped numbers in the table below. Please let me know if you want to share corrections or have any updates.

Country

Number

Country

Number

Country

Number

Australia

3

Indonesia

1

South Africa

1

Belgium

1

Ireland

1

Sri Lanka

1

Bermuda

1

Israel

1

Sweden

3

Brazil

2

Italy

2

Switzerland

1

Canada

6

Japan

1

Taiwan

2

Chile

1

Korea

3

Thailand

1

China

12

Macedonia

1

Netherlands

2

Czech Republic

1

Poland

2

Turkey

1

Denmark

1

Portugal

1

United Arab Emirates

2

France

3

Qatar

1

United Kingdom

5

Germany

5

Russia

1

United States

18

Greece

1

Singapore

1

Vietnam

1

India

2

 Slovenia

1

 

TOTAL

97

Update (26apr): Corrected 1 entry (UK -> Ireland)

The UC Architects Podcast Ep37

UC2We’re glad to announce the availability of episode 37 of The UC Architects podcast.

This episode is hosted by Steve Goodman, who is joined by Michael van Horenbeeck, John Cook, Ståle Hansen and Michel de Rooij. Editing was done by Andrew Price.

Min topics discussed in this episode are:

  • MEC wrap-up
  • Azure AD sync preview
  • IIS Log File cleanup
  • Heartbleed and HLBs
  • Exchange Online Protection enhancements
  • Digicert Heartbleed vulnerability scan and detection
  • Using Lync like a Lync pro
  • Monitoring peak call capacity
  • SIPFED address change
  • Windows Phone 8.1
  • Lync for Mac 2011 14.0.7 hotfix
  • BYOD in a WiFi infrastructure
  • Lync April 2014 Cumulative Update
  • Office of iPad
  • eNow’s Hybrid monitoring product.

More information on the podcast including references and a link to download the podcast here or you can subscribe to the podcasts using iTunes, Zune or use the RSS feed.

About
The UC Architects is a bi-weekly community podcast by people with a passion for Unified Communications; our main focus is on Exchange, Lync or related subjects.