Exchange Updates – March 2017

Ex2013 LogoToday, the Exchange Team released the March updates for Exchange Server 2013 and 2016, as well as Exchange Server 2010 and 2007. The latter will receive its last update, as Exchange 2007 will reach end-of-life April 11, 2017.

As announced in December updates, Exchange 2013 CU16 and Exchange 2016 CU5 require .NET 4.6.2. The recommended upgrade paths:

  • If you are still on .NET 4.6.1, you can upgrade to .NET 4.6.2 prior of after installing the latest Cumulative Update.
  • If you are on .NET 4.52, upgrade to Exchange 2016 CU4 or Exchange 2013 CU15 if you are not already on that level, then upgrade to .NET 4.6.2, and finally upgrade to the the latest Cumulative Update.

The Cumulative Updates also include DST changes, which is also contained in the latest Rollups published for Exchange 2010 and 2007.

For a list of fixes in these updates, see below.

Exchange 2016 CU5 15.1.845.34 KB4012106 Download UMLP
Exchange 2013 CU16 15.0.1293.2 KB4012112 Download UMLP
Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 17 14.3.352.0 KB4011326 Download
Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 23 8.3.517.0 KB4011325 Download
  • KB4015665 SyncDelivery logging folders and files are created in wrong location in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB4015664 A category name that has different case-sensitivity than an existing name is not created in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB4015663 “The message content has become corrupted” exception when email contains a UUE-encoded attachment in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB4015662 Deleted inline picture is displayed as attachment after you switch the message to plain text in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB4015213 Email is still sent to Inbox when the sender is deleted from the Trusted Contacts list in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB4013606 Search fails on Exchange Server 2016 or Exchange Server 2013
  • KB4012994 PostalAddressIndex element isn’t returning the correct value in Exchange Server 2016

Exchange 2013 CU16 fixes:

  • KB4013606 Search fails on Exchange Server 2016 or Exchange Server 2013

Exchange 2010 SP3 RU17 fixes:

  • KB4014076 Migration ends and errors reported when you on-board or off-board a mailbox through Exchange Online in an Exchange Server 2010 hybrid environment
  • KB4014075 UNC path does not open in OWA when the path contains non-ASCII characters in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB4013917 You cannot search in a shared mailbox through OWA in an Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 (Update Rollup 15 or 16) environment
  • KB4012911 Culture element is added in the wrong order when you use the ResolveNames operation in EWS in Exchange Server 2010

Notes:

  • Exchange 2016 CU5 doesn’t include schema changes, however, Exchange 2016 CU5 as well as Exchange 2013 CU16 may introduce RBAC changes in your environment. Where applicable, use setup /PrepareSchema to update the schema or /PrepareAD to apply RBAC changes, before deploying or updating Exchange servers. To verify this step has been performed, consult the Exchange schema overview.
  • When upgrading your Exchange 2013 or 2016 installation, don’t forget to put the server in maintenance mode when required. Do note that upgrading, before installing the Exchange binaries, setup will put the server in server-wide offline-mode.
  • Using Windows Management Framework (WMF)/PowerShell version 5 on anything earlier than Windows Server 2016 is not supported. Don’t install WMF5 on your Exchange servers running on Windows Server 2012 R2 or earlier.
  • When using Exchange hybrid deployments or Exchange Online Archiving (EOA), you are allowed to stay at least one version behind (n-1).
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
  • Cumulative Updates can be installed directly, i.e. no need to install RTM prior to installing Cumulative Updates.
  • Once installed, you can’t uninstall a Cumulative Update nor any of the installed Exchange server roles.
  • The order of upgrading servers with Cumulative Updates is irrelevant.

Caution: As for any update, I recommend to thoroughly test updates in a test environment prior to implementing them in production. When you lack such facilities, hold out a few days and monitor the comments on the original publication or forums for any issues.

MS17-015: Security Fix for Exchange 2013 SP1+CU14 & 2016 CU3

Ex2013 LogoMicrosoft published security fixes for the issue described in bulletin MS17-105. Fixes have been released for the following product levels:

You are reading it correctly: the later Cumulative Updates are not affected. Earlier builds will not receive a security fix, as support is provided up to N-2 generation builds. Reason for Exchange 2013 SP1 being in there is that Service Packs are on a different support scheme.

Note that this Rollup or security fix replaces MS16-108 (kb3184736) – you can install MS13-105 over installations containing this security fix (no need to uninstall it first).

Exchange admins & PowerShell

imageMany people I encounter in the field of Office 365 or Exchange have an infrastructure background. That is, they know a lot about their product(s), how to make it work (or don’t), how to manage, deploy or troubleshoot, etcetera.

Then there is, the let us call it, the reality check of the cloud era, with a roller coaster of cloud-originating developments. This requires a different management focus for these products, resulting in products architected for scale, and introducing configuration and management instruments primarily designed to be ready for automation and operate on scale as well. PowerShell support in Microsoft products is such an instrument.

The introduction of PowerShell required folks with an infrastructure background to develop a new skill: instead of clicking buttons in an interface, they should also become a PowerShell practitioner. Not necessarily wizard level, but at least they need to know their way around when managing their environment using PowerShell, reading and interpreting scripts provided by Microsoft or other vendors prior to usage, or even make changes to make those scripts fit for their own environment.

Writing scripts is another matter. This requires a tad different mindset, where you make repeatable tasks repeatable (time-saving), less prone to error (job-saving), and reusable by your coworkers or even the community who may need to perform the same task. Of course, everybody also expects your scripts to be generic (no hard-coded elements), robust and resilient, adding 90% more code (a bit exaggerated, but you get the idea).

What most of administrators struggle with, is making the connection between managing the product using PowerShell, and how to start using PowerShell to develop their own set of scripts or tools to automate tasks their environment. Administrators wanting to learn such skills will usually find is great books about the product, and great books on learning (generic) PowerShell. Of course, existing scripts found using their favorite search engine can also be a great starting point, provided somebody already developed it for the task you are trying to accomplish.

With the Exchange Server 2016 administrator in mind, Exchange fellows Dave Stork and Damian Scoles tried to bridge that gap with their book, Practical PowerShell: Exchange Server 2016. It uses some practical Exchange-themed examples, how to approach the problem, and how to go from running a few cmdlets in sequence to developing small scripts which operate against one or multiple servers. Also, while this book aims at the on-premises Exchange administrators, the skills learned are not lost when the organization moves to Exchange Online as these scripting skills are compatible.

Knowing how difficult it can be to transfer knowledge to paper from my own experience, I think Dave & Damian did a respectable job. The timing of the book release is also interesting, as the product which introduced PowerShell to so many of us, Exchange Server 2007, is going End of Life soon, on April 2011, 2017 to be exact. Realizing PowerShell has been around now for so many years, there is no excuse to get your PowerShell skills going, unless you want to share the faith of dinosaurs.

More information on the book, including a sample chapter, is available at https://www.practicalpowershell.com.

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Exchange and VMWare Guest Introspection

Ex2013 LogoIn this long overdue article, I would like to share an experience, where a customer was upgrading from Exchange 2010 to Exchange 2013. Note that this could also apply to customers migrating from Exchange 2007 or migrating to Exchange 2016 as well. The Exchange 2013 servers were hosted on VMWare vSphere 5.5U2; the Exchange 2010 servers on a previous product level.

The customer saw a negative impact on the end user experience of Outlook 2010 users, especially those working in Online Mode. Other web-based services like Exchange Web Services (EWS) were affected as well. The OWA experience was good.

Symptoms
After migrating end user mailboxes from Exchange 2010 to Exchange 2013 (but as indicated, this applies to Exchange 2016 as well), end users reported delays in their Outlook client responses, where sometimes Outlook seemed to ‘hang’ when performing certain actions like accessing a Shared Mailbox. Also, when opening up the meeting planner in order to schedule a room using Scheduling Assistant, it could take a significant amount of time, (i.e. minutes) before the schedule of all the rooms was being displayed.

The end users’ primary mailbox was configured to use Cached Mode, except for VDI users who used their primary mailbox in Online Mode. Shared Mailboxes were used in Online Mode due to the size (Outlook 2010, so no slider).

Analysis
First, the overall health of the Exchange environment was checked to exclude it as a potential cause. Exchange performance metrics were monitored, as well as Managed Availability status and events, logs like the RCA logs, and VMWare CPU Ready % to check for potential vCPU allocation issues (read: oversubscription). None of these metrics caused any reason for concern.

After reconfiguring the HOSTS file, in order to bypass the load balancer and direct traffic to a single Exchange server to simplify troubleshooting, the symptoms remained. Then, we checked:

  • TCP/IP optimization settings, e.g. RSS, Chimney, etc.
  • VMWare VMXNet3 offloading, e.g. Large Send Offload, TCP Checksum Offloading
  • VMWare VMXNet3 buffer settings

All those settings were also found to be on their recommended values.

We started digging in from the client’s perspective, and used WireShark to see what was going on on the wire. After filtering on the Exchange host, we saw the following pattern:

image

Note that this customer used SSL Offloading, so mailbox access took place on port 80 instead of 443 (RPC/http).

As you might notice, there is a consistent 200ms delay after the client receives its response (e.g. packets 106 and 110). When searching around for ‘200ms’ and ‘delay’, you may end up with articles describing the effect of the Nagle algorithm (Delayed ACK). Nagle is meant to reduce chatter on the wire, but can have a negative effect on near real-time communications, especially with small packets. Also, while 200ms might seem small, looking at the number of packets exchanged between Outlook and Exchange, this can add up quite quickly. Most of these articles will also describe a fix, recommending to configure a registry key TcpAckFrequency, and set it to 1 (default is 2). For testing purposes, we configured this key and after the mandatory reboot, the end user Outlook experience was snappy. However, setting this key would impact all client communications (real as well as VDI clients); not a recommended long-term solution due to side effects on the network.

After removing the registry key, investigating was continued. Since there was no issue with the Exchange 2010, we started to suspect there was perhaps an issue with VMWare, or there was some form of network optimization or packet inspection going on. This, due to the fact there was no problem with the old Exchange environment, and the elements that changed when migrating were VMWare vSphere version, physical vSphere hosts, and last but not least, the protocol switched. This client didn’t use Outlook Anywhere, so RPC/http was not enabled for Exchange 2010 prior to migration, and clients connected using MAPI. After some more investigating, some potentially related articles on the VMWare knowledgebase were found, talking about latency issues in certain VMWare Tools versions, the VMWare guest driver set, and downgrading these to 5.1 would have the same effect as configuring TcpAckFrequency. Unfortunately, this wasn’t an option as the hardware level of the VMWare guests already was on a certain level.

introRemediation
When installing VMWare Tools, the package comes with some system-level drivers which handle communications between the guest and the host or other guests. One of these drivers is the VMWare Guest Introspection driver (or VMCI Drivers, and formerly VShield Drivers). This component can be identified in the guest in the presence of the system drivers vnetflt and vsepflt, and accommodates agentless antivirus solutions like McAfee MOVE. However, it seems to also interfere with certain workloads in their driver ecosystem, thus negatively impacting real-time communications. I wasn’t able to test if the change from MAPI to RPC/http (or later MAPIhttp) also contributed to this effect, as the Introspection driver may not scan MAPI RPC packets at all, in which case there is no overhead introduced.

Needless to say disabling the Guest Introspection component might be less desirable for some organizations, and in those cases, when you experience this issue, I suggest contacting your VMWare representative, after verifying your VMWare Tools are part of the list of recommended versions.

In the end, in this situation Guest Introspection was disabled and a file-level scanner was introduced (with the required exclusions, of course). Performance for Online Mode was optimal when accessing Online Mode mailboxes, and using Exchange web services like Scheduling Assistant showed room planning in seconds rather than minutes.

image.pngNote that unfortunately, recent versions of VSphere running Exchange virtualized workloads also have this issue. On the plus side, they allow for separate (de)installation of the file system driver (NSX File Introspection Driver) and the network driver (NSX Network Introspection Driver). I am pretty sure removing the network driver would suffice, which might be a viable solution for some folks as well.

If you have any insights to share, please leave them in the comments.

Results Install-Exchange15 survey

stats chartA short blog on a small survey I’ve been running for some time now on the usage of Install-Exchange15, the PowerShell script for fully automated deployment of Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016.

I started the survey because I was curious on a few things:

  • How the script is used; do folks use it for deploying in lab environments, or also actual production environments.
  • What Exchange versions are deployed; only current ones (n-2 at most, i.e. lagging 2 Cumulative Update generations at most), or also older versions.
  • What operating systems are used to deploy Exchange using this script.

The second and last items are of most interest, as keeping backward compatibility in the script, for example like deploying Exchange Server 2013 SP1 on Windows Servers 2008, requires keeping a lot of ‘legacy code’ in there.

Fortunately, the survey shows many of you use the script to deploy recent Exchange builds on current operating systems. So, in time, you will see support for older builds and operating systems being removed, making the script more lean and mean as well.

Now, on to the results:

In what environments do you use the script to deploy Exchange?

Lab

Production

Yes

86%

72%

No

14%

28%

Do you use Install-Exchange15.ps1 for previous (N-2 or older) Exchange 2013/2016 builds?

Yes 28%
No 72%

On which Operating Systems do you deploy Exchange 2013/2016? (multiple options possible)

Windows Server 2008 0%
Windows Server 2008 R2 18%
Windows Server 2012 18%
Windows Server 2012 R2 100%
Windows Server 2016 8%

Finally, a summary of the feedback and requests send in by respondents through the open comments section:

  • Installation on Windows Server 2016. The survey was created before Windows Server 2016 was supported, so we used the feedback given on people deploying on WS2016 in the above results.
  • In general, positive feedback on having this script for automated deployment, as well as the SCP feature.
  • Request for having a GUI to create the answer file.
  • Request to having the option to configure the virtual directories after installation. However, the script allows for inserting custom (Exchange) cmdlets in its post-configure phase.
  • Request to output cause of failed Exchange setup to the screen. That however, is something I wouldn’t recommend; the Exchange setup log files contain the details.
  • Request to have some sort of visible clue if the installation was successful or not.

Exchange Updates – December 2016

Ex2013 LogoToday, the Exchange Team released the December updates for Exchange Server 2013 and 2016, as well as Exchange Server 2010 and 2007.

Changes introduced in Exchange Server 2016 CU4 are an updated OWA composition window, and on Windows Server 2016, KB3206632 needs to be present before CU4 can be deployed. This KB fixes – among other things – the problem with DAG members experiencing crashing IIS application pools. Be advised that the KB3206632 update for Windows Server 2016 is a whopping 1 GB. You can download this update here.

The biggest change for Exchange Server 2013 is support for .NET 4.6.2. Be advised organizations running Exchange 2016 or 20103 on .NET 4.6.1 should start testing with and planning to deploy .NET 4.6.2, as the March updates will require .NET 4.6.2, which is currently still optional.

Both Cumulative Updates introduce an important fix for indexing of Public Folder when they were in the process of being migrated. To ensure proper indexing, it is recommended to move public folder mailboxes to a different database so they will get indexed properly.

The Cumulative Updates also include DST changes, which is also contained in the latest Rollups published for Exchange 2010 and 2007.

For a list of fixes in these updates, see below.

Exchange 2016 CU4 15.1.669.32 KB3177106 Download UMLP
Exchange 2013 CU15 15.0.1263.5 KB3197044 Download UMLP
Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 16 14.3.339.0 KB3184730 Download
Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 22 8.3.502.0 KB3184712 Download
  • KB 3202691 Public folders indexing doesn’t work correctly after you apply latest cumulative updates for Exchange Server
  • KB 3201358 Set-Mailbox and New-Mailbox cmdlets prevent the use of the -Office parameter in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3202998 FIX: MSExchangeOWAAppPool application pool consumes memory when it recycles and is marked as unresponsive by Health Manager
  • KB 3208840 Messages for the health mailboxes are stuck in queue on Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3186620 Mailbox search from Exchange Management Shell fails with invalid sort value in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3199270 You can’t restore items to original folders from Recoverable Items folder in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3199353 You can’t select the receive connector role when you create a new receive connector in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3193138 Update to apply MessageCopyForSentAsEnabled to any type of mailbox in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3201350 IMAP “unread” read notifications aren’t suppressed in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3209036 FIX: “Logs will not be generated until the problem is corrected” is logged in an Exchange Server 2016 environment
  • KB 3212580 Editing virtual directory URLs by using EAC clears all forms of authentication in Exchange Server 2016

Exchange 2013 CU15 fixes:

  • KB 3198092 Update optimizes how HTML tags in an email message are evaluated in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3189547 FIX: Event ID 4999 for a System.FormatException error is logged in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3198046 FIX: The UM mailbox policy is not honored when UM call answering rules setting is set to False in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3195995 FIX: Event ID 4999 with MSExchangerepl.exe crash in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3208886 Send As permission of a linked mailbox is granted to a user in the wrong forest in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3188315 Messages are stuck in outbox when additional mailboxes are configured in Outlook on Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3202691 Public folders indexing doesn’t work correctly after you apply latest cumulative updates for Exchange Server
  • KB 3203039 PostalAddressIndex property isn’t returning the correct value in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3198043 Shadow OAB downloads don’t complete in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3208885 Microsoft.Exchange.Store.Worker.exe process crashes after mailbox is disabled in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3201966 MSExchangeOWAAppPool application pool consumes excessive memory on restart in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3209041 FIX: An ActiveSync device becomes unresponsive until the sync process is complete in an Exchange Server environment
  • KB 3209013 FIX: The LegacyDN of a user is displayed incorrectly in the From field in the Sent Items folder on an ActiveSync device
  • KB 3209018 FIX: Results exported through the eDiscovery PST Export Tool never finishes in an Exchange Server environment
  • KB 3199519 Inconsistent search results when email body contains both English and non-English characters in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3211326 “ConversionFailedException” error when emails are sent on the hour in Exchange Server 2013

Notes:

  • Exchange 2016 CU4 doesn’t incldue schema changes compared to CU4, however, Exchange 2016 CU4 as well as Exchange 2013 CU15 may introduce RBAC changes in your environment. Where applicable, use setup /PrepareSchema to update the schema or /PrepareAD to apply RBAC changes, before deploying or updating Exchange servers. To verify this step has been performed, consult the Exchange schema overview.
  • When upgrading your Exchange 2013 or 2016 installation, don’t forget to put the server in maintenance mode when required. Do note that upgrading, before installing the Exchange binaries, setup will put the server in server-wide offline-mode.
  • Using Windows Management Framework (WMF)/PowerShell version 5 on anything earlier than Windows Server 2016 is not supported. Don’t install WMF5 on your Exchange servers running on Windows Server 2012 R2 or earlier.
  • When using Exchange hybrid deployments or Exchange Online Archiving (EOA), you are allowed to stay at least one version behind (n-1).
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
  • Cumulative Updates can be installed directly, i.e. no need to install RTM prior to installing Cumulative Updates.
  • Once installed, you can’t uninstall a Cumulative Update nor any of the installed Exchange server roles.
  • The order of upgrading servers with Cumulative Updates is irrelevant.

Caution: As for any update, I recommend to thoroughly test updates in a test environment prior to implementing them in production. When you lack such facilities, hold out a few days and monitor the comments on the original publication or TechNet forum for any issues.

The UC Architects Podcast Ep61

iTunes-Podcast-logo[1]Episode 61 of The UC Architects podcast is now available. This episode is hosted by Pat Richard, who is joined by Tom Arbuthnot and Stale Hansen. Editing was done by Andrew Price.

Topics discussed in this episode are:

Top Stories 

  • Microsoft Teams released to preview

Office 365

  • Office 365 and Azure now available from U.K. datacenters

Lync/Skype for Business

  • SfB Response Group; Exchange UM holidays – multi-add, multi-assign, import from CSV and CAL
  • Australian RGS/Response Groups Holiday Sets for 2016/2017
  • Holiday set editor
  • Response Group Timeframe Editor Powershell GUI
  • Skype for Business Cloud Connector Edition: Release 1.4.1
  • Skype for Business, Bandwidth Calculator Version 2.70
  • Add a Skype Menu Item for Meet Now Dedicated (Anthony Caragol)
  • Skype for Business Online Multi-Region, Automated Meeting Migration and Exchange Server Voicemail
  • Video Based Screen Sharing (VbSS) comes to iOS and Android Mobile SfB Clients
  • Certificate Expiry Checklist
  • Two new posters for SharePoint 2016 and Skype for Business architectural models
  • Running #Polycom Trio with #Skype4B? Make sure to upgrade to the latest 5.4.3AD release
  • CustomInvite by Modality
  • VMware Horizon VDI Skype for Business Support Tech Preview Q1 2017
  • Outlook Skype for Business “Contacts” folder doesn’t sync with Skype for Business contacts
  • Update to Hybrid Handbook 2.1
  • Free Skype for Business Online Network Assessment Tool from Microsoft, Hands On

You can download the podcast here or you can subscribe to the podcasts using iTunes, Zune or use the RSS feed.

About
The UC Architects is a community podcast by people with a passion for Unified Communications; our main focus is on Exchange, Skype for Business or related subjects.

Advisory: Hold off deploying Exchange 2016 CU3 on WS2016 for now

Ex2013 LogoLast Update: December 13th, 2016: The Windows team published an update for Windows Server 2016, which should fix the issue with DAG members crashing when restarted. The related article is KB3206632, and you can download it here. Be advised, the Windows Server 2016 update – which also fixes other issues – is nearly 1 GB!

About one month ago, Exchange Server 2016 Cumulative Update 3 was released which supported deployment on Windows Server 2016. However, recently issues are being reported on various communities as well in related blog comments, where Exchange 2016 became unstable, symptoms being randomly crashing IIS application pools (which says nothing about the root cause).

Microsoft acknowledged there is an issue with Exchange Server 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016:

If you attempt to run Microsoft Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016, you will experience errors in the IIS host process W3WP.exe. There is no workaround at this time. You should postpone deployment of Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016 until a supported fix is available.

So, be advised to hold off to deploying Exchange 2016 on Windows Server 2016 until further notice.

Update: The Exchange Team has also posted a notice that an update is in the works, and to delay further Exchange 2016 deployments on Windows Server 2016 until this delay has been made available. No ETA on the update yet.

Ignite 2016 Sessions + Downloader

imageNote: Due to Microsoft putting Ignite 2016 contents on YouTube and a new portal, I had to rewrite the download script. Mattias Fors was also working on this, and after integrating his contents pointers, I present you Ignite2016Download.ps1. Check the description on Technet Gallery page for usage options.

Today, the Ignite 2016 event will kick off in Atlanta, US. The agenda contains the whopping number of 1412 sessions, of which 395 touch Office 365 and 133 Exchange in some way or another.

With those numbers it is impossible to attend every session for folks interested in these topics, but luckily Microsoft will also publish Ignite 2016 sessions on Channel 9 this year.

Some of the interesting sessions to watch out for are (links should resolve to on-demand sessions, as they become available):

Session Description Speaker(s)
BRK1021 Unplug with the Microsoft Outlook experts Julia Foran, Gabe Bratton, Allen Filush, JJ Cadiz, Eduardo Melo, Amanda Alvarado, Victor Wang, James Colgan
BRK1044 Dive deeper into what’s new and what’s coming in Outlook on the web Dave Meyers, Eduardo Melo
BRK2033 Discover Office 365 Groups – overview, what’s new and roadmap Amit Gupta, Christophe Fiessinger
BRK2035 Learn about advancements in Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection Jason Rogers, Phil Newman
BRK2053 Connect your business critical applications to Outlook and Groups David Claux
BRK2044 Discover what’s new and what’s coming for Office Delve Cem Aykan, Mark Kashman
BRK2093 Design your Exchange infrastructure right (or consider moving to Office 365) Boris Lokhvitsky, Robert Gillies, Adrian Moore
BRK2139 Protect your business and empower your users with cloud Identity and Access Management Nasos Kladakis
BRK2170 Discover what’s new with Microsoft Exchange Public Folders Sampath Kumar
BRK2215 Debate the top 10 reasons not to move your Exchange on-premises mailboxes to Exchange Online Tony Redmond, Greg Taylor, Steve Conn
BRK2216 Unplug with the experts on Exchange Server and Exchange Online Greg Taylor, Timothy Heeney, Jeff Mealiffe, Ross Smith IV, Wendy Wilkes
BRK2217 Discover modern support in Outlook for Exchange Online Julia Foran, Amir Haque, Gabe Bratton
BRK2218 Move from Exchange 2007 to Modern Exchange Greg Taylor, Steve Conn
BRK2219 Meet twin sons of different mothers – Exchange Engineers and Exchange MVPs Tony Redmond, Jeff Mealiffe, Andrew Higginbotham, Jeff Guillet, Karim Batthish
BRK2220 Peer behind the curtain – how Microsoft runs Exchange Online Paavany Jayanty, Eddie Fong, Karim Batthish, Mike Swafford
BRK3000 Unplug with the experts on Microsoft Exchange Top Issues Nino Bilic, Nasir Ali, Amir Haque, Shawn McGrath, Timothy Heeney, Gabe Bratton, Angela Taylor
BRK3001 Explore the ultimate field guide to Microsoft Office 365 Groups Tony Redmond, Amit Gupta, Benjamin Niaulin
BRK3007 Investigate tools and techniques for Exchange Performance Troubleshooting Nasir Ali, Jeff Mealiffe
BRK3019 Manage Microsoft Office 365 Groups Eric Zenz, Vince Smith
BRK3023 Understand how Microsoft protects you against Spoof, Phish, Malware, and Spam emails Jason Rogers
BRK3045 Use Microsoft Graph to reach users on hybrid Exchange 2016 Venkat Ayyadevara
BRK3046 Build intelligent line-of-business applications leveraging the Outlook REST APIs Venkat Ayyadevara
BRK3074 Discover what’s new in Active Directory Federation and domain services in Windows Server 2016 Sam Devasahayam
BRK3109 Deliver management and security at scale to Office 365 with Azure Active Directory Brjann Brekkan
BRK3139 Throw away your DMZ – Azure Active Directory Application Proxy deep-diveThrow away your DMZ – Azure Active Directory Application Proxy deep-dive John Craddock
BRK3216 Plan performance and bandwidth for Microsoft Office 365 William Looney, Ed Fisher
BRK3217 Run Microsoft Exchange Hybrid for the long haul Timothy Heeney, Nicolas Blank
BRK3219 Migrate to Exchange Online via Exchange Hybrid Michael van Horenbeeck, Timothy Heeney
BRK3220 Deploy Microsoft Exchange Server 2016 Brian Day, Jeff Guillet
BRK3221 Understand the Microsoft Exchange Server 2016 Architecture Ross Smith IV, Mike Cooper
BRK3222 Implement Microsoft Exchange Online Protection Jennifer Gagnon, Wendy Wilkes
BRK3227 Ask us anything about Microsoft Office 365 Groups Eric Zenz, Darrell Webster, Christophe Fiessinger, Martina Grom
BRK3253 Experience Scott Schnoll’s Exchange tips and tricks Scott Schnoll
BRK3254 Cert Exam Prep: Exam 70-345: Designing and Deploying Microsoft Exchange Server 2016 Vladimir Meloski
BRK4031 Overcome network performance blockers for Office 365 Deployments Paul Collinge
BRK4032 Dive deep into Microsoft Exchange Server High Availability Andrew Higginbotham
PRE18 The previous decade called…they want their Exchange Server back Michael van Horenbeeck, Greg Taylor, Sampath Kumar, Andrew Higginbotham, Timothy Heeney, David Espinoza, Nicolas Blank
THR1005R Dive deeper into what’s new and what’s coming in Microsoft Outlook 2016 for Windows Misbah Uraizee
THR1011R Dive deeper into what’s new and what’s coming in Outlook mobile Allen Filush, Victor Wang, James Colgan
THR2007R Fight back with advancements in Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection Phil Newman, Atanu Banerjee
THR2054 Understand the risk and value of your public folder data BEFORE you migrate Dan Langille
THR2190R Secure your sensitive email with Office 365 message encryption Gagan Gulati, Ian Hameroff
THR3001R Migrate DL to Microsoft Office 365 Groups Siva Shanmugam, Loveleen Kolvekar
THR3015 Use RMS in Microsoft Office 365 Nathan O’Bryan
THR3040 Automate Exchange deployment with Powershell Desired State Configuration Ingo Gegenwarth
THR3082 Secure Office 365 in a hybrid directory environment Alvaro Vitta

For those that wish to view sessions offline, there is a script to download the slidedecks and videos. It does so by scraping the Ignite portal, downloading slidedecks from the portal itself, and videos from the related YouTube video link using an utility youtube-dl.exe (which you can also use to download playlists, quite neat). The script can take some parameters:

  • DownloadFolder to adjust the download folder.
  • Format to alter the dimensions and quality of the downloaded videos (see help for supported formats).
  • Title to filter on title keyword
  • Keyword to filter on description keyword.
  • Start to use a different version number to start scraping. Scraping is done sequentially; in the output you will notice a (#nnn) next to the title. That is the current post number.
  • NoVideos to skip downloading videos.

You can download the script from the TechNet Gallery here.

Exchange Server Role Requirements Calculator 8.3

Exchange 2010 Mailbox Role Sizing Calculator 16.4The Exchange team published an update for the Exchange Server Role Requirements Calculator, the tool to aid you in properly sizing your Exchange Server 2013 or Exchange Server 2016 deployment.

The new version number is 8.3, and it contains two major enhancements compared to version 7.9:

  • Added ability for the calculator to automatically determine the number of Mailbox servers and DAGs that need to be deployed to meet the chosen input requirements
  • Added Read from Passive support for Exchange 2016 deployments which results in decreased bandwidth utilization for HA copies

You can download the calculator here. For more information, please consult the list of changes here or Read Me here.