Exchange Updates – March 2016

Ex2013 LogoToday, the Exchange Team released one big wave of Exchange updates for Exchange 2016 down to Exchange 2007.

Changes in contained in these updates:

  • Exchange 2016 CU1 is an uncompressed ISO file. If bandwidth is scarce where you will be deploying, be sure to download this 6GB file upfront.
  • Mailbox Anchoring, introduced with the previous CU for Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2016, is reverted.
  • Exchange 2010 supports stand-alone Exchange 2010 Hybrid wizard.
  • All updates will introduce updated OWA/Ootw S/MIME control.

For a list of fixes in these updates, see below.

Exchange 2016 Cumulative Update 1 15.1.396.30 KB3134844 Download UML
Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 12 15.0.178.4 KB3108023 Download UML
Exchange 2010 Service Pack 3 Rollup 13 14.3.294.0 KB3141339 Download
Exchange 2007 Service Pack 3 Rollup 19 8.3.459.0 KB3141352 Download

Exchange 2016 CU1 fixes:

  • KB 3139730 Edge Transport service crashes when you view the properties of a poison message in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3135689 A custom SAP ODI URI is removed by ActiveSync from an email message in an Exchange Server environment
  • KB 3135688 Preserves the web.config file for Outlook Web App when you apply a cumulative update in Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3135601 Cyrillic characters are displayed as question marks when you run the “Export-PublicFolderStatistics.ps1” script in an Exchange Server 2016 environment
  • KB 3124242 Mailbox quota is not validated during migration to Exchange Server 2013 or Exchange Server 2016

Exchange 2013 CU12 fixes:

  • KB 3143710 “Failed Search or Export” error occurs when an eDiscovery search in the Exchange Admin Center finishes
  • KB 3138644 Messages are stuck in the Submission queue until NDRs are returned or the server is restarted
  • KB 3137585 OAuth authentication fails in a proxy scenario between Exchange Server 2013 hybrid on-premises and Office 365
  • KB 3137581 An eDiscovery search of all mailboxes or some Distribution Groups fails when you use the Exchange Administration Center
  • KB 3137390 “DeviceId cannot contain hyphens” warning occurs when you use the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange Administration Center to remove the associations in Exchange Server
  • KB 3137384 Error occurs when you remove an ActiveSync device in the Exchange Management Shell or from the Exchange Administration Center
  • KB 3137383 CafeLocalProbe fails if the Health Mailbox UPN doesn’t match its Active Directory domain name
  • KB 3137380 Both read receipts and Non-read receipts are generated when an email is read through IMAP or POP in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3137377 MSExchange FrontEnd Transport service crashes when email messages are processed that contain a null “X-OriginatorOrg” message header
  • KB 3136694 Calendar items are not synced correctly when you use Exchange ActiveSync on a mobile device
  • KB 3136404 Searching by Furigana in Outlook’s address book is unsuccessful in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3135689 A custom SAP ODI URI is removed by ActiveSync from an email message in an Exchange Server environment
  • KB 3135334 Cannot set Title in Exchange Admin Center (ECP) if it contains more than 64 characters
  • KB 3135269 Event ID 4999 with MSExchangerepl.exe and MSExchangeDagMgmt.exe crash in Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3135018 Cannot remove devices when the DeviceType property includes a forward slash
  • KB 3134952 EdgeTransport.exe crashes when you view details of messages in the poison message queue
  • KB 3134918 An IRM-protected message sent to an external contact isn’t returned in a search or discovery results when journaling is implemented in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3134894 The “Search-Mailbox” cmdlet together with the “Attachment” property keyword lists all items that contain the query string of “attachment”
  • KB 3128706 HttpProxy overloads a downlevel Client Access Server in an Exchange Server 2013 co-existence environment
  • KB 3124248 Managed Availability responders fail because of invalid WindowsService names in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3124242 Mailbox quota is not validated during migration to Exchange Server 2013 or Exchange Server 2016
  • KB 3124064 Event ID 1009 is logged and no Health Manager alerts on failed content indexes during migration in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3118902 Resource Booking Assistant doesn’t update the subject of a recurring meeting in Exchange Server 2013
  • KB 3109539 Exchange Management Shell doesn’t return the correct number of Exchange Server 2013 Enterprise CALs license
  • KB 3108415 Logon for POP3 client disconnects randomly in an Exchange Server 2013 environment
  • KB 3106236 The “Export-PublicFolderStatistics.ps1” cmdlet exports Russian (Cyrillic) characters as question marks
  • KB 3098561 “Error executing child request for /owa/auth/errorFE.aspx” when you browse to /ECP in Exchange Server 2013

Notes:

  • Exchange 2016 CU1 includes schema changes, and Exchange 2013 CU12 may introduce RBAC changes in your environment. When applicable, make sure you run PrepareSchema /PrepareAD before deploying. To verify this step has been performed, consult the Exchange schema overview.
  • If you have deployed KB3097966 on your Exchange server running on Windows Server 2012 R2, you may want to manually recompile the .NET assemblies before upgrading Exchange to significantly speed up the process. To accomplish this, run the following on every Exchange server on Windows Server 2012 R2:
    “%windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\ngen.exe update”
    Don’t get upset by the messy output and any error messages; if the result of this command shown in the output is ‘0’ you’re good to go.
  • Be advised .NET Framework 4.6.1 is still not supported; make sure you don’t install this .NET update on your Exchange servers.
  • The Windows Management Framework (WMF)/ PowerShell version 5 is not supported. Don’t install this on your Exchange servers.
  • When using Exchange hybrid deployments or Exchange Online Archiving (EOA), you are required to stay current.
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
  • Cumulative Updates can be installed directly, i.e. no need to install RTM prior to installing Cumulative Updates.
  • Once installed, you can’t uninstall a Cumulative Update nor any of the installed Exchange server roles.
  • The order of upgrading servers with Cumulative Updates is irrelevant.
  • Rollups are cumulative per service pack level, meaning you can apply the latest Rollup for Service Pack X to a Service Pack X installation.

Finally, as always for any Hotfix, Rollup, Service Pack or Cumulative Update, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production. When you lack such facilities, hold out a week or two and monitor the comments on the original article or TechNet forum for any issues.

 

Exchange 2010 SP3 RU12 & Exchange 2007 SP3 RU18

Exchange 2010 LogoThe Exchange Team released Rollup 12 for Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 (KB3096066) as well as Rollup 18 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB3078672). These update raise version numbers to 14.3.279.2 and 8.3.445.0 respectively.

Apart from a Daylight Savings Time update, documented here, these Rollups contain the following fixes:

Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 12:

  • KB 3048372 Exchange Calendar items are shifted incorrectly when some Windows DST updates are applied
  • KB 3096125 CryptographicException error when Edge Transport service crashes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB 3097219 Organizer’s name isn’t displayed in the subject of the recurring meeting requests in Exchange Server 2010
  • KB 3106421 Very long URLs in an email message don’t open in OWA in Internet Explorer
  • KB 3115809 Mailboxes can be accessed when the DefaultNetworkCredentials option is selected when you use Exchange Web Services Managed API to connect to Exchange Server

Exchange Server 2007 SP3 Rollup 18:

  • KB 3106421 Very long URLs in an email message don’t open in OWA in Internet Explorer

Notes:

    • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
    • If you got an Exchange 2010 DAG, and want to properly update the DAG members, check the instructions here.
    • As for any Hotfix, Rollup, Service Pack or Cumulative Update, apply this update to a acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production. When you lack such facilities, hold out a certain period and monitor the comments on the release article or TechNet forum for any issues.

Rollups are cumulative per service pack level, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you can apply the latest Rollup after installing a fresh installation of RTM or SPx version, for that product level.

You can download Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 12 here and Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 18 here.

Exchange 2010 SP3 RU10 & Exchange 2007 SP3 RU17

Exchange 2010 LogoThe Exchange Team released Rollup 10 for Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 (KB3049853) as well as Rollup 17 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB3056710). These update raises the version numbers to 14.3.248.2 and 8.3.417.1 respectively.

Rollup 10 contains the following fixes for Exchange Server 2010 SP3:

  • KB 3069055 Various DAG maintenance scripts do not work in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB 3057422 “MapiExceptionNoAccess: Unable to query table rows” error and some mailboxes cannot be moved
  • KB 3056750 Exchange ActiveSync application pool crashes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB 3054644 “The item no longer exists” error when you access an archive mailbox in Outlook Web App in Exchange Server 2010
  • KB 3051284 Event ID 4999 is logged and MSExchangeServicesAppPool crashes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB 3049596 Event ID 4999 is logged and remote procedure call Client Access service crashes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • KB 2964344 MSExchangeRPC service stops working intermittently in Exchange Server 2010
  • KB 3055764 Exchange Server 2010 Address Book Service crashes with event ID 4999

For Exchange Server 2007 SP3, the Rollup 17 contains the following fix:

  • KB 3057222 “InvaIidOperationException” error and cannot open digitally signed or NDR messages in FIPS-enabled Exchange Server 2007

Notes:

  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking.
  • If you got an Exchange 2010 DAG, and want to properly update the DAG members, check the instructions here.
  • Rollups are cumulative per service pack level, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

You can download Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 10 here and Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 14 here.

Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 15

exchange2007logo2[1]Today the Exchange Team released Rollup 15 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB2996150). This update raises Exchange 2007 version number to 8.3.389.2.

This Rollup contains a security update to fix a potential elevation of privilege issue (bulletin MS14-075), as well as the following fixes:

  • 3004235 Exchange Server meetings in Russian time zones as well as names of time zones are incorrect after October 26, 2014
  • 3008308 Public folder database migration issue in a mixed Exchange Server environment

Notes:

  • When running ForeFront Protection for Exchange, make sure you disable ForeFront before installing the rollup and re-enable it afterwards, otherwise the Information Store and Transport services may not start. You can disable ForeFront using fscutility /disable and enable it using the fscutility /enable command;
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking;
  • Rollups are cumulative per service pack level, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

As with any Hotfix, Rollup or Service Pack, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this rollup in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production.
You can download Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 15 here.

Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 14

exchange2007logo2[1]Today the Exchange Team released Rollup 14 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB2936861). This update raises Exchange 2007 version number to 8.3.379.2.

This Rollup introduces daylight saving times (DST) changes.

Notes:

  • When running ForeFront Protection for Exchange, make sure you disable ForeFront before installing the rollup and re-enable it afterwards, otherwise the Information Store and Transport services may not start. You can disable ForeFront using fscutility /disable and enable it using the fscutility /enable command;
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking;
  • Rollups are cumulative per service pack level, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

As with any Hotfix, Rollup or Service Pack, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this rollup in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production.

You can download Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 14 here.

Impersonation: To be, or pretend to be

imageAs frequent readers of this blog may know, I made several Exchange-related scripts available to the community. Some of these scripts make use of what is called Exchange Web Services (EWS). I receive lots of questions via e-mail and through the comments about configuring impersonation or permission-related issues when running those scripts, which support delegated access as well as impersonation, against mailboxes. This blog shows how can configure delegation, why you should use impersonation, and how to configure impersonation on Exchange 2007 up to Exchange 2013 and Exchange Online in Office 365.

Introduction

EWS provides functionality to allow client applications, such as Outlook or OWA apps, tools, or in my case scripts, to communicate with Exchange server. Even Exchange itself makes uses of EWS when performing Free/Busy lookups by the Availability services for example. EWS was introduced in Exchange Server 2007 back in December 2006, which now seems decades ago.

Some of these EWS scripts or tools access or even manipulate mailbox contents. In the MAPI era, in order for you to access a mailbox that’s not yours, you required delegated full access permissions. These permissions could be granted at the mailbox, mailbox database or mailbox server level. The latter would grant you access to all mailboxes hosted in that mailbox database. For example, to grant an account Archibald full access permission on the mailbox of Nestor, you would typically use something like:

Add-MailboxPermission –Identity Nestor –User Archibald –AccessRights FullAccess –InheritanceType All

Note: Specifying InheritanceType is sometimes overlooked. Not specifying it only configures an Access Control Entry (ACE) on the top level folder (InheritanceType None), resulting in symptoms like scripts not processing subfolders for example.

EWS enables you to use another access method besides delegation, which is impersonation. Impersonation, as the many online available dictionaries may tell to you, is ‘an act of pretending to be another person for the purpose of entertainment or fraud’ or something along those lines. In the Exchange world, this means you can have an account which has the permission to pretend to be the owner of the mailbox, including being subject to the same effective permissions. So, if for some reason the owner only has Read permission on a certain folder, so will the impersonator. Typical use cases for impersonation are for example applications for archiving, reporting or migration, but also scheduled scripts that need to process mailboxes could be one.

Before we dive into the configuration itself, first some of the reasons why you should should prefer Impersonation over delegated access:

  • No mailbox needed for the account requesting access.
  • Throttling benefits, since the operation is subject to the throttling policy settings configured on the mailbox accessed, not the throttling policy configured on the mailbox requesting access. To bypass these delegate limits, one had to configure and assign a separate throttling policy with no limits for the account. Of course, a bad behaving application could then run without boundaries from a resource perspective, something throttling policies try to limit.
  • In Exchange 2010 and up, impersonation leverages Role Based Access Control, which is better manageable than a collection of distributed  ACEs.
  • Actions performed by the impersonator are on behalf of the impersonated. This may complicate auditing, as logging will come up with actions performed by the impersonated user, not the impersonator.

Note that where ‘user’ is specified below with regards to granting permissions, one could also specify a security group as well unless mentioned otherwise.

Impersonation on Exchange 2007

On Exchange 2007, you configure impersonation by granting the following two permissions:

  • The ms-Exch-EPI-Impersonation permission grants the impersonator the right to submit impersonation calls. It is configured on Client Access Servers. This does not grant the impersonation right, just the right the make the call through a CAS server.
  • The ms-Exch-EPI-May-Impersonate when granted, allows the impersonator to impersonate selected accounts.

To configure these permissions in your Exchange 2007 environment, use:

Get-ClientAccessServer | Add-AdPermission –User svcExchangeScripts –ExtendedRights ms-Exch-EPI-Impersonation

Then, we can configure impersonation permission on the mailbox level:

Get-Mailbox Tintin| Add-ADPermission –User svcExchangeScripts –ExtendedRights ms-Exch-EPI-May-Impersonate

on the database level:

Get-MailboxDatabase MailboxDB1 | Add-ADPermission –User svcExchangeScripts –ExtendedRights ms-Exch-EPI-May-Impersonate

or mailbox server level:

Get-MailboxServer MailboxServer1 | Add-ADPermission –User svcExchangeScripts –ExtendedRights ms-Exch-EPI-May-Impersonate

Be advised that members of the various built-in Admin groups are by default explicitly denied impersonation permissions on the server and database level, and deny overrules allow. You will notice this when querying impersonation configuration settings, for example on the database level (in the screenshot example, olrik was granted impersonation permissions):

Get-MailboxDatabase | Get-AdPermission | Where { $_.ExtendedRights –like ‘ms-Exch-EPI-Impersonation’} | Format-Table Identity, User, Deny, IsInherited, ExtendedRights –AutoSize

image

Note that permissions assigned on the mailbox may not immediately be reflected as you are administering them in Active Directory. Changes in Active Directory are subject to AD replication, and the Exchange Information Store caches information for up to 2 hours, so worst case it may take up to 2 hours and 15 minutes for new permission settings to be re-read from Active Directory.

Impersonation on Exchange 2010 and 2013

Exchange 2010 introduced Role Based Access Control, better known by its acronym RBAC. For a quick introduction to RBAC, see one of my earlier blogs here. There is a management role associated with impersonation, which is ApplicationImpersonation.

To enable a user impersonation rights, create a new assignment for ApplicationImpersonation and assign it to the user:

New-ManagementRoleAssignment –Name 'AIsvcExchangeScripts' –Role ApplicationImpersonation –User svcExchangeScripts

Note that if we want to assign these permissions to a security group, we need to use the SecurityGroup parameter instead of User, specifying the group name.

Now be careful, when used like this you will have granted that user or group permission to impersonate all users in your Exchange organization. Here is where RBAC comes into play, or more specific the RBAC feature named management role scopes. With write scopes for example, you can limit the scope of where you can make changes in Active Directory. For more information on management role scopes, see here.

Let  us assume we want to limit the scope to a distribution group named ‘All Employees’, using New-ManagementScope in combination with RecipientRestrictionFilter. Note that when specifying MemberOfGroup in the filter, you need to use the distinguishedName of the group:

New-ManagementScope –Name 'Employee Mailboxes' –RecipientRestrictionFilter { MemberOfGroup –eq 'CN=All Employees,OU=Distribution Groups,OU=NL,DC=contoso,DC=com'} 

We can then apply this scope to the assignment created earlier:

Set-ManagementRoleAssignment –Identity 'AIsvcExchangeScripts' –CustomWriteScope 'Employee Mailboxes'

Be advised that in a multi-forest environment, impersonation doesn’t work when you assign permissions to cross-forest accounts. You either need to assign impersonation permissions to an account residing in the same forest as Exchange, or create a linked role group.

Impersonation on Exchange Online

Impersonation is available in most Office 365 plans, but currently not in the small business plans.  To configure Impersonation in Exchange Online we need to connect anyway, so we’ll first open a remote PowerShell session to Exchange Online:

$EXO= New-PsSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell -AllowRedirection -Authentication Basic
Import-PsSession $EXO

Provide tenant administrator credentials when prompted. You can then see if you have the ApplicationImpersonation role at your disposal using:

Get-ManagementRole –Identity ApplicationImpersonation

If nothing is returned, you may need to resort to delegate access permissions.

Configuring impersonation is identical to configuring it in Exchange 2013. Nonetheless, some people may be more comfortable using the Exchange Admin Center. If so:

  1. Open up Exchange Admin Center.
  2. Navigate to Permissions > Admin Roles
  3. Now we can’t directly assign a management role through EAC, so assume we’ll create a role group for our application account by clicking New (+).
  4. Enter a name for your role group, e.g. ExchangeMaintenanceScripts.
  5. Add the role ApplicationImpersonation.
  6. Add the accounts which need Impersonation permissions, e.g. svcExchangeScript.
  7. Optionally, you can also select a Write Scope, which you need to create upfront through Exchange Management Shell.
  8. In Exchange on-premises, instead of a Write Scope you will have the option to select a a specific OU instead (scope filter RecipientRoot parameter) .
  9. When done, Save.

image

One word of caution: scopes are not automatically updated when objects referenced are relocated or change names. Now, for your own environment you may have this under control through some form of change management process. For Exchange Online however, your tenant might get relocated without notice. Therefor, should impersonation fail, verify any management scopes you may have defined for distinguishedName references, and check if they require updating, e.g.

Set-ManagementScope -Name 'All Employees' -RecipientRestrictionFilter { MemberOfGroup -eq 'CN=All Employees,OU=contoso.onmicrosoft.com,OU=Microsoft Exchange Hosted Organizations,DC=EURPR05A001,DC=prod,DC=outlook,DC=com'}

Final words

Note that many EWS-based scripts or tools do not natively support EWS but make use of the Exchange Web Services Managed API. This installable package consists of support files (e.g. DLL’s) which provide EWS functions to your PowerShell environment. You can download the current version of EWS Managed API here (2.2). You can read more on developing with EWS Managed API here, or you can have a peek at the source of code of one of my EWS scripts or the ones published by Exchange MVP-fellow Glen Scales’ here.

Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 13

exchange2007logo2[1]Today the Exchange Team released Rollup 13 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB2917522). This update raises Exchange 2007 version number to 8.3.348.2.

This Rollup introduces the following fix:

  • 2926397 An Edge Subscription file from an Exchange 2013 Edge Transport server is rejected by an Exchange 2007 Hub Transport server

This Rollup also adds support for using Windows Server 2012 R12 domain controllers in your Exchange 2007 SP3 RU13 environment; it does not add support for running Windows Server 2012 R2 forest or domain functional levels.

Notes:

  • When running ForeFront Protection for Exchange, make sure you disable ForeFront before installing the rollup and re-enable it afterwards, otherwise the Information Store and Transport services may not start. You can disable ForeFront using fscutility /disable and enable it using the fscutility /enable command;
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking;
  • Rollups are cumulative, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

As with any Hotfix, Rollup or Service Pack, I’d recommend to thoroughly test this rollup in a test and acceptance environment first, prior to implementing it in production.

You can download Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 13 here.

MS13-105: Security Fix & Rollup Fest for Exchange 2007/2010/2013

Ex2013 LogoToday the Exchange Team released security fixes for the issue described in bulletin MS13-105. Fixes have been released for the following product levels:

Note that depending on the release scheme fixes are either made available through a Rollup or as security fix; the Rollups only address the vulnerabilities mentioned in security bulletin.

Note that this Rollup or security fix replaces MS13-061 – you can install MS13-105 over installations containing MS13-061 (no need to uninstall it first).

Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 11

exchange2007logo2[1]Today the Exchange Team released Rollup 11 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB2873746). This update raises Exchange 2007 version number to 8.3.327.1.

Here’s the list of changes included in this Rollup:

  • 2852663 The last public folder database on Exchange 2007 cannot be removed after migrating to Exchange 2013
  • 2688667 W3wp.exe consumes excessive CPU resources on Exchange Client Access servers when users open recurring calendar items in mailboxes by using OWA or EWS

In addition to these fixes, this Rollup also includes a fix for the security issue described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS13-061.

Notes:

  • When running ForeFront Protection for Exchange, make sure you disable ForeFront before installing the rollup and re-enable it afterwards, otherwise the Information Store and Transport services may not start. You can disable ForeFront using fscutility /disable and enable it using the fscutility /enable command;
  • If you want to speed up the update process for systems without internet access, you can follow the procedure described here to disable publisher’s certificate revocation checking;
  • Rollups are cumulative, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

You can download Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 11 here.

Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 10

exchange2007logo2[1]Today the Exchange Team released Rollup 10 for Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 3 (KB2788321). This update raises Exchange 2007 version number to 8.3.298.3.

Here’s the list of changes included in this Rollup:

  • This Rollup adds coexistence with Exchange Server 2013. However, for coexistence Exchange Server 2013 Cumulative Update 1 (CU1) is required, which hasn’t been released yet.
  • 2783779 A hidden user is still displayed in the Organization information of Address Book in OWA in an Exchange Server 2007 environment

In addition to these fixes, this Rollup also includes a fix for the security issue described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS13-012 and new daylight saving time (DST) updates.

When running ForeFront Protection for Exchange, make sure you disable ForeFront before installing the rollup and re-enable it afterwards, otherwise the Information Store and Transport services may not start. You can disable ForeFront using fscutility /disable and enable it using the fscutility /enable command.

Note that Rollups are cumulative, i.e. they contain fixes released in earlier update Rollups for the same product level (RTM, SP). This means you don’t need to install previous Rollups during a fresh installation but can start with the latest Rollup package.

You can download Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 10 here.